Monthly Archives: September 2014

Trespasser

trespasserPaul Doiron, author of The Poacher’s Son, has penned a series of books featuring Maine Game Warden Mike Bowditch.  His strength as an author lies in his characterization of the people and landscape of Maine, imbuing his stories with a strong sense of place.  I have always been a sucker for stories that do this well.  Doiron has created a likable main character in the person of Bowditch–an honest man with a very troubled past.  When he makes his bad decisions–which he often does–we as readers are right along with him for the ride.  In this story, Mike is obsessed with the disappearance of a girl from the scene of an accident, only to turn up later as the victim of a grisly murder.  Mike Bowditch blames himself for not pursuing the missing girl and while conducting his own non-official investigation, runs afoul of the police, public officials, and many others (including his live-in girlfriend).  Author Doiron’s portrayal of the brutal poverty of Maine juxtaposed with the natural beauty of the landscape is what keeps me coming back to his stories.  The plot in this one, however, lacked something and the big reveal of the murderer at the end felt motiveless and flat.  That being said, still would pick up one of his novels for an entertaining read.

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Gone Girl Shoulda Stayed Gone

I’ve bowed to popular culture and picked up Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl. I won’t say much because by this time everyone has probably already read it and formed their opinions. In the past, I’ve read and enjoyed Flynn’s other works of psychological suspense, and after all the ballyhoo over this newest one, was prepared for a real thrill ride.  Unfortunately, I was greatly disappointed.  I don’t like to write bad reviews (although I think Flynn’s success can ride out my few, negative comments) but there is not much positive I can say about this novel.  It starts out strong: Amy Dunne, on her fifth wedding anniversary to husband Nick, has gone missing and all evidence suggested she was forcefully abducted.  As the story unfolds, the author peels the onion and gives us a glimpse of a marriage on the verge of collapse.  Suspicions shift and we are kept guessing whether husband, Nick, is perhaps a monster in disguise.  That’s the good part.  The bad part is that every single character in the story is intensely unlikeable.  Nick and Amy are self-absorbed, narcissistic, irresponsible, childish, violent and weak. I found I didn’t care whether Amy was dead, whether Nick killed her, and at some point almost hoped he had.  The story has some surprising twists, but after one or two the reader starts thinking, “Oh, come on now!  I can’t buy this.”  The plot, after a rather dull and sagging portion in the middle, becomes more absurd as it hurdles towards the conclusion.  I, unlike others, didn’t mind how it ended.  I was just glad it was over.

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Painful Memories Destroying Lives

knifeedgeAuthor Laurie Halse Anderson took on a tough issue in her new YA novel The Impossible Knife of Memory. The story opens with the main character, Hayley Kincain, attending high school in her dad’s home town and feeling alienated from the other kids, who she terms “zombies.”  This is the first time Hayley has settled down in one spot since her dad returned from the war in Iraq with severe PTSD.  Her life up to this point has been on the road in his rig, lurching from job to job, town to town.  He has resolved that his daughter needs to be in one place for a while, but he has not resolved to seek help for himself–which is the real problem.  Hayley has been forced into the role of parent to her dad, who is sometimes violent, moody, often drunk or drugged, and is becoming increasingly unstable.  She hides the severity of his disfunction from friends, school officials, and her ex-step mother–the one person who understood and was willing to step up and help.  Laurie Halse Anderson, author of such prize-winning works as Speak, does a masterful job illustrating the tension in Hayley’s life as she tries to keep her dad safe from others as well as himself.  What the author fails to do is write a believable love story between Hayley and an oddball student, Finn.  The dialog between these two characters is awkward, out of character, and often breaks the mood of the rest of the novel.  I liked Finn and wanted to believe in their romance, but for me it didn’t work.  Hayley in the beginning of the novel is such an unlikeable, bitter, and arrogant character that I was bored with her and tempted to put the novel down, but pressing on and with the revelation of more of her background, she became more sympathetic and softer.  A good story, but overly long.

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